RSSAll Entries Tagged With: "Your Flesh book review"

sonnyliston.book

SONNY LISTON WAS A FRIEND OF MINE by Thom Jones; Little, Brown, Inc. 1999

A collection of pulpy tales, most of them dirty—as in the neighborhood tavern with a Rourke character as the bartender. Sonny Liston is a beautifully exercised piece about love and hate and dysfunction. The author’s veteran status also provides for some colorful Vietnam stories which are not written from a victim point of view as […]

willeford

WILLEFORD by Don Herron; Dennis McMillan, 1997

In a letter to a friend sent shortly before his death in 1987 Charles Willeford wrote, “The plot really doesn’t matter that much, as long as you have one; the important thing is the characters.” Likewise, Don Herron’s study Willeford offers a collection of biographical anecdotes culled from Willeford’s published works and personal papers that […]

pussykingofthepirates

PUSSY, KING OF THE PIRATES by Kathy Acker; Grove Press, 1996

The events which happen between the covers of Kathy Acker's latest novel could be spelled out in one sentence or maybe even in a word or two. The form of the novel could also be explained succinctly. Damned be the downsizers, I say. A brief synopsis is not a reliable method of deciding how much […]

invisible

INVISIBLE REPUBLIC: BOB DYLAN'S BASEMENT TAPES by Greil Marcus; Henry Holt, 1997

In 1975 all-American music critic Greil Marcus scripted the liner notes for Bob Dylan and the Band's

prisonerofx

PRISONER OF X: 20 YEARS IN THE HOLE AT HUSTLER MAGAZINE by Allan MacDonell; Feral House, 2006

I have no doubt that twenty years of being employed at Flynt Publishing would lead one to be exposed to excesses of every sort—so I also have no doubt that some hyperbole is being employed in this book as well. The amount of time penning the "asshole of the month" column would be quite handy […]

intothebadlandsjpg

INTO THE BADLANDS: TRAVELS THROUGH URBAN AMERICA by John William; Flamingo/Harper Collins, 1991

Roundly more fascinating for its anecdotal take on America as seen through the eyes of an Englander than Badlands is interesting for its main motivation: tracking down Mr. William's favorite American pulp fiction writers (Burke; Hiaasen; Paretsky; Leonard; Ellroy; Crumley; Vachss, etc.), of which more than a few of I don't share his enthusiasm for—though it's the thread of commonality that drew me to it in the first place. But, as I've mentioned already, that really isn't what makes Badlands interesting. Sure, some of the interview segments are worthwhile in and of themselves, but they're merely kindling.

sexrevolts

THE SEX REVOLTS: GENDER, REBELLION AND ROCK'N' ROLL by Simon Reynolds and Joy Press; Harvard University Press, 1995

The combination of music criticism and cultural studies rarely produces anything of relevance to the meaning of music. Even when the combination succeeds, the outcome is usually about as artistic a statement as demonstrating the ability to swallow one's own tail. Cultural studies is about consumption, art is about creation. The Sex Revolts is an […]

wintersbone

WINTER'S BONE by Daniel Woodrell; Little, Brown Inc., 2006

I wish I could accurately convey the necessary admiration for this writer and especially for this book. In today’s publishing climate, it’s frankly a miracle that James Patterson’s publisher had the balls to release such a decidedly non-commercial work.  While you might find both Woodrell and Patterson in the crime section of your local bookstore, […]

deathofsweetmister

THE DEATH OF SWEET MISTER by Daniel Woodrell; Putnam, 2001

Although the critics love him, Daniel Woodrell, easily one of the top twenty novelists currently working in this country, has yet to receive his due. Ang Lee’s excellent adaptation of Woodrell’s masterpiece, Woe To Live On, released as Ride With the Devil, seemed destined to bring the author out of the shadows, but for inexplicable […]

americanhc1sted

AMERICAN HARDCORE: A TRIBAL HISTORY by Steven Blush; Feral House, 2001

I have little respect for someone who uses a literary opportunity for an ulterior motive, which is what author Blush does here. The former music promoter makes a disingenuous attempt to document the history of the “hardcore” punk movement while pimping his third generation band, No Trend, which had absolutely nothing to do with any […]